GOTH GIRL – Jamie Cohen and The Cheeters

GOTH GIRL is from LIES IN HIGH FIDELITY, Volume 1 of THE CHEETERS (Dietrich Von Bone, Klaus Kertz, Gunter Vile).

Goth girl sports a new tattoo
Black ink from a painful tool
That girl chain drinks through her high-jinx
It’s the only thing that funk can do
Plays her upright bass in a parking space
While your car is broken into
And your heart is broken in two

What the funk does it matter

Goth girl jokes but it’s no laughing matter
Turns you on then turns on you

What the funk does it matter

  THE CHEETERS – Lies In High Fidelity

 GOTH GIRL

 THE CHEETERS – Klaus Kertz, Gunter Vile, Dietrich Von Bone


LIES IN HIGH FIDELITY – “Only The Dead Have Seen The End Of War”

“Only the dead have seen the end of war,” a quote from George Santayana, reflects the message of LIES IN HIGH FIDELITY, a song from THE CHEETERS debut album of the same name. The Cheeters are Gunter Vile, Dietrich Von Bone (aka Jamie Cohen), and Andy Kravitz (Klaus Kurtz).

Another day been broken
Asylum doors are open
Everybody’s gone, the lunatics have all moved on
Their plan is up and running, sell the 2nd coming
Mirror, smoke and ashes
Sell it to the masses
Lies in high fidelity
Being broadcast on your TV

You can smell it in the air
Taste it everywhere
Crimes have been committed
War for them is big money business
Their plan is up and running
Sell the 2nd coming
Mirror, smoke and ashes
Sell it to the masses
Lies in high fidelity
Being broadcast on your TV


FIRST DAY ON THE JOB – Get Yourself A Coffee

From LIES IN HIGH FIDELITY, the first of 3 volumes from THE CHEETERS, a rock & roll music project featuring Gunter Vile, Dietrich Von Bone (aka Jamie Cohen) and Klaus Kurtz (aka Andy Kravitz). FIRST DAY ON THE JOB tells the story of diving deep into the steno pool, working long hours, getting home after dark. Produced by The Cheeters and the VAC.

Features Dietrich Von Bone on vocals.

First day on the job, so what do you say
Must do it for love cause it can’t be the pay
Think you’re saving up for a rainy day?
Your nest egg may be golden but the sky is steel gray
Get yourself a coffee and put that umbrella away

First day on the job

The income is nil and the wages are cruel
You feel more helpless than when you were at school
Now you take a nosedive in the steno pool

No time for a lunch break
Join the rat race
Get home after dark

THE CHEETERS, V1, LIES IN HIGH FIDELITY

 THE CHEETERS
KLAUS KURTZ,DIETRICH VON BONE,GUNTER VILE

CHEETERS MUSIC


MUSIC OF THE POST-PARADIGM: American Spring 2012

THE AMERICAN SPRING OF 2012

Liberty hangs in the balance at every moment, never still and always moving to maintain a footing. A nation at a crossroads has historically proven to be a less than pretty sight.  The 21st Century, arriving with the epic and viceral collapse known as 911, has continued a tidal wave of collapse trajectory through the first decade and now, in the year 2012, is taking hold. In America lines have been drawn and distinctions have been made.  Those few with most are drawing their battle plans, hording their riches and seeking to influence those who can change the law do change the law in favor of limitations that restrict democracy, freedom and liberty.  Meanwhile, the many with little have little.  But they do have a name.  They are the 99%.

We are the 99%.

We are men, women, children.  We are doctors, housewives, janitors, war veterans.  We are artists, poets and car mechanics.  We are ranchers, farmers and schoolteachers.  We are mothers, fathers and grandparents. We are journalists, watchkeepers. We are the anonymous and the known. We are everyone, everywhere. We are in America. We are in France and Spain and throughout Europe.  We are in all countries of Africa.  We are the people of Iran, Iraq, Syria, Egypt, Palestine, Israel. We are in Australia, Brazil, Chile, Hungary, the U.K. We are in every city of every state of every country and we are of every nation. We are the 99%.

The 99% understand how the concept of infinite growth has come and gone, the paradigm exhausted. One is reminded of the only graph used by Michael C. Ruppert in his speeches on Collapse to illustrate the dramatic spike in world population, a trajectory in line with its main and finite ingredient and catalyst, oil. Burn-off from the era of petroleum man is collapsing our ecosystem.

Now on the streets and in the neighborhoods and cities of America we are headed into spring followed by the long, hot days of summer. Crimes are being committed, liberties are being removed and there is a giant contraction taking place fueled by the greed, fear and the arrogance of the few.

Do not go back to sleep.

THE NIGHTCLUB AT THE END OF THE WORLD (NEW)

NEW is a space conceived by Michael C. Ruppert from the cabin of his Lifeboat Hour, a weekly radio show hosted by Ruppert and aired by Progressive Radio Network, Sunday at 9p Eastern. Ruppert points out how NEW and the Lifeboat Hour is not all bad news, that it is an original mix of music with madness, laughter with loss, skills with sorrow, community with calamity, love with grief, and joy in the moment.

Musically speaking, Ruppert is fond of playing cuts from a Venice, CA music project called the New White Trash (NWT), of which Ruppert is a founding member with Wade De Void, Andy Kravitz and others. The theme of the NWT is ‘Music of the Post-Paradigm’. The NWT manifesto reads like this:

Mining a new groove, and with a kind of rough grace, DOUBLEWIDE, the 37 song, 2 CD set from the NEW WHITE TRASH, chronicles the slide of the former American middle-class down a steep and slippery slope to the New White Trash, a place impartial to race, religion, creed or color.

The New White Trash (NWT) demographic is the outcome of the former middle class being folded in with the working poor and, for good measure, the unemployed and uninsured.  The NWT defines and represents a majority of people whose common bond includes and exists beyond the demographics of age, race, location, education. The people of the NWT are the new ‘have-not’s’, and by its nature and size, this vast swath of population (99%) is now squarely at odds with the 1% who own, operate and dispense our corporate universe, big pharma, big food, big oil, big defense and big government included. ‘By the people for the people’ is receding.

The Post-Paradigm Era describes the vacuum left by the sudden disappearance of the former American middle class.  It is in this vacuum we now find ourselves, tumbling in turmoil as home losses mount, bank balances shrink, and shelters are jammed with the likes of you and I. The good old days are done and dusted. That party is over. The coming chaos of the post-paradigm era will lead to a radical and immediate rethinking and remaking of America or it will lead us to complete devastation.

As Woody Guthrie filled a musical vacuum by acknowledging the pain and the suffering of the Great Depression, the New White Trash fills a bigger and more insidious vacuum left by a rampant, programmed consumerism that serves only corporations and their shareholders. 

This is a new breed of American music in which the message is clear: You’re f**ked.  But now what?  

NWT portrays a post-paradigm, ‘less beautiful’ America, brought to life through music, media, theatre and message – those of, love,need and a desire for social justice. ‘Drop it down’, ‘don’t dig too deep’, ‘we charge extra for this’, ‘take these’, ‘we can’t escape from’, all are the language of the NWT.  And for good reason.

If you got no credit and you got no cash, you’re NWT.  If you got more going out than you got coming in, you’re NWT. If your 401k is MIA, if you’ve filed for bankruptcy, if you find yourself living in a trailer or back with your parents, if your unemployment has run out, if your roads have holes and local schools are closing, if you lost your health insurance to a pre-existing condition, you are the NWT. If you bought the hype and borrowed on a dream,and now your house is gone and you’re selling your things, you’re the NWT. If you’re pissed off, yet you keep a sliver of love in your crossed heart and at least a post-ironic smile on your lips, you’re NWT. If what you had is gone – just like that – then you know you’re running with the New White Trash.

 The NWT offers what popular music does not: it recognizes and acknowledges all those who are being marginalized and dropping off the radar screens of “official” life. It is not all depressing. In fact, the NWT celebrates the joys, simple pleasures and love that are often re-discovered only in the darkest times.

NWT was produced by and at the Venice Arts Club. Other music produced by VAC promotes a similar tune and travels a road populated with the familiar themes of the Lifeboat Hour and the NEW. The VAC supports Ruppert’s effort for truth and social justice and gives a nod to his journey and his vision by presenting a gathering of relevant songs from our collection. Thanks for tuning in.

THE NEW WHITE TRASH – ‘It Would Be Strange’

NEW WHITE TRASH – ‘Running With The New White Trash’

FELL MUSIC – ‘Dangerous Ground

FELL MUSIC – ‘American Lite’

FELL MUSIC – ‘Somewhere South’

THE CHEETERS – ‘Bombshell Breakup’


JOHN GOODWIN – Art and Music

VAC member John Goodwin is a Nashville based craftsman of lyric and song.  John is also a fine painter and an actor who played a part in a film called Crazy Heart for which he wrote or co-wrote one or a couple of songs.  JG and Jeff Bridges are friends and Jeff invited John to Santa Fe for a cameo in the film.  JG has a writing credit with The Cheeters for C WHAT DA DOSE IS‘ the lyrics to the song were written by JG and Cheeters member Jamie Cohen (aka Dietrich Von Bone).

NIGHTINGALE – John Goodwin, oil on canvas


ANOTHER KID WITH A GUN – Music & Social Commentary in the Post-Paradigm Era

Music as narrative, social commentary, and as a voice and act of protest threads a particular path through the American cultural and political experience.  Venice Arts Club promotes recording artists who use music and song as tools of recognition, and who forge rebellion and revolution through song lyric, rhythm, and melody.

The tone of much of FELL MUSIC is apparent by song title, including War Eternal, More War Now, Dangerous Ground, American Lite, Big Bird Over Baghdad, Made In The USA, Frontline.

Likewise, THE CHEETERS, a rock and roll ‘art band’, covers similar ground with Lies In High Fidelity, Baton Rouge, Bombshell Breakup, and Bring Me The News.

The NEW WHITE TRASH, a music project produced by Venice Arts Club, and whose members include activist Michael C. Ruppert, musician Wade De Void, grammy-nominated Andy Kravitz, and recording artist Kristen Vigard, released DOUBLEWIDE, a 2-disc, 37 song collection of ‘music of the post-paradigm’. Tracks highlighting such a paradigm are Running With The New White Trash, Don’t Dig Too Deep, Meltdown, Running On Rumor, to name a few.

Likewise, the 8 volume Venice Arts Club Music Project includes By Degree, Appointment In Samarra, Liberty, Got Your Gun Yet, Paralyze Me, No Love In Haiti, and Another Kid With A Gun, a song featuring VAC regulars Michael Jost, Spring Groove, Malia Luna, Michael C. Ruppert, Doug Lewis.

Check out this video for Another Kid With A Gun:


THE CHEETERS – It’s Only Rock and Roll But You’ll Like It

THE CHEETERS, DOUG LEWIS (aka Gunter Vile), JAMIE COHEN (Dietrich Von Bone) and ANDY KRAVITZ (Klaus Kurtz)are an art band – their music is an art project. The Cheeters were not built to last, they were about a go for broke moment – They went deep and deeper still – Buddha was in the back seat and Bacchus was at the wheel. The Cheeters are an urgent confession, an uncompromising creative explosion marked by intelligence in the tradition of Captain Beefheart, Rage Against the Machine, and Nick Cave. The music is solid, inspired but it is the subtle lyrics, the sophisticated imagery and the complex multi-textured sound mix that is the band’s trademark. There is humor and passion and the pure joy of invention in this music and the Cheeters always tell the truth and never pull their punches. This is music made by men, not boys, and the stories are of lived lives, not fantasies, told by guys that got laid, not guys wishing they got laid. What strikes one about listening to the Cheeters is how present they are, how in the zeitgeist, giving you the newest news, the latest edition. They embraced randomness and found objects. What does that mean? I get a call from Lewis, car noise, clanking beer cans, he’s somewhere in Santa Fe, “Hey man, we just met this chick in a 7-11 while stopping for cigarettes and she says she can sing. We’re headed back to the studio now.” There was no master plan. They were on a wild ride, totally dedicated to the realm of the magical and committed and it was all holy. It was dangerous, probably crazy and they were on a grand high, a high stakes transcendent journey reduced to a four box set. That is how the dust settles on angels with outstretched wings. Lewis and Cohen had a shared sensibility that went back over twenty five years. They wrote together and emerged as one voice. They knew how to tread in darkness, they knew how to mine the madness and they knew the poetry of lust and outrage. Doug Lewis is a master of the crooked phrase, a knowing wit and a musical sensibility informed by the bands of his psychedelic Marin County youth such as Tower of Power and the Sons of Champlin. Cohen was also a consummate wordsmith, steeped in the blues and in the dada-surrealist sensibility. Listen to the Cheeters and you will hear echoes of absurdist poet, Tristian Tzara, as well as Kurt Weil and Bertolt Brecht. Weil & Brecht. Lewis & Cohen. If they met they’d share respect. Andy Kravitz, a two time Grammy winning producer, mixer, writer, engineer, and drummer was their soul brother, the catalytic third element and the maestro of the secret sauce. The Cheeters are about love, beauty, the ambiguous ephemeral, life, death and sex. It’s not only rock and roll but you’ll like it.  M.D. Baer/July 4, 2009


BRENT ARNOLD – Bright So To Blind Me, Music Video

Brent Arnold is a founding member of The Cheeters. Here is a new work by Brent:


THE CHEETERS – Baton Rouge

BATON ROUGE performed by THE CHEETERS – Gunter Vile (Doug Lewis), Dietrich Von Bone (Jamie Cohen), Klause Kertz (Andy Kravitz).

From the album LIES IN HIGH FIDELITY

CLICK ON IMAGES FOR VIDEO



JAMIE COHEN – Pieces Of Art

These are some of the last sketch-art pieces doodled by artist/musician Jamie Cohen before he passed away Sept. 11, 2008.  More of Jamie Cohen art here, and some of his music with the Cheeters and Venice Arts Club Music.

JAMIE COHEN SKETCH-ART.1

 JAMIE COHEN SKETCH-ART .2

JAMIE COHEN SKETCH-ART.3

jamie cohen sketch-art

JAMIE COHEN SKETCH-ART.4

jamie cohen sketch-art

JAMIE COHEN SKETCH-ART.5

jamie cohen sketch-art

JAMIE COHEN SKETCH-ART.6

jamie cohen sketch-art


FELL MUSIC – Sonic Waves From Venice, CA

ARTICLE AND INTERVIEW BY M.D. BAER FOR SMARTCHANNEL.TV

The four-album Fell Music project was recorded at Lotek Studios, Mar Vista, CA from 1994-2007.  Produced by Arthur Barrow and Doug Lewis, the original seven albums were edited into a four-album project now hosted by Bandcamp, the independent music hosting site. The Fell Music project sets the tone for other music projects and collaborations by Doug Lewis, whose propensity for ‘bringing in the neighborhood’ is evident in Fell Music and remains a strong theme of his later work, including The Cheeters, Venice Arts Club Music, New White Trash and Gunter Vile.

M.D. BAER: Fell Music is both similar and unlike your other projects, similar in that it is a large body of work, and also how it brings in a group of contributors to the project, many of whom are not trained musicians, or musicians at all. Also, the sound is more produced, yet not as intimate as your later work.  Can you trace the beginnings of Fell Music and it’s evolvement into your later projects?

LEWIS: My first experiences recording sound were with Jim Lewis – Col. Jim Lewis – my dad.  Jim had a thing for audio, mostly tinkering, but did a lot of reel to reel recording of Jazz music, also Hawaiian, which is where I grew up (Hawaii) until I was ten. He also had a decent stereo system; late sixties and seventies stereo systems were rocking – big home speakers, a MacKintosh turntable and an analog receiver that weighed a ton. Back then, music sounded really good through his system, especially the Jazz and the Hawaiian.

M.D. BEAR: That’s a long way from rock and roll…

LEWIS: Rock & Roll was around my corner, that’s for sure. After Jim retired from the Army he moved us to San Francisco, Marin County exactly. Summer Of Love, June of 1967. His dream was to become a television news broadcaster, or work in radio, which he fulfilled.  He had a real passion for speaking, using his voice.  He had maybe the lowest voice ever, not gravely or smoke-filled, but low in a smooth and pleasantly resonant way…I wouldn’t know another voice to compare it to. Lee Marvin had a low voice which always caught me off guard, but nowhere near Jim’s tenor.

M.D. BAER: And the music?

LEWIS: Went from Jim’s turntable collection to San Fran street scene in full bloom. SF was the place, that’s for sure, and at the same time Marin was a hotbed of psychedelic activity. I was young, but still, the times were groovy. And so was the music. I became radicalized by the experience, caught a glimpse of the power of Love, and witnessed a revolution of sorts. I was enough in the cycle of its movement to have been influenced, probably profoundly. From there, it was a quick series of lefts and rights to GO! by John Clellon Holmes, then Kerouac,Ginsberg, Burroughs, Paul Bowles, the lot. I self-educated, developed an urge for self-expression, let the words of Whitman, Neruda,, Crane and Proust fall into place.  Around that same time I had an older friend, kind of a big brother named Ralph Robinson.  Ralph was in the Air Force, stationed at Travis, and he would take me out on backpacking trips through the Sierras.  Shaw said that thirteen is the age when the ‘passions bloom’…or they don’t. He was referring to art, poetry, color, nature both natural and human. This aligns perfectly with my story. At that age I lived through a dynamic consequence of events, the San Fran revolution, Vietnam, available literature and a viseral experience with nature and the road.  I began to seek adventure, saw myself as a poetic adventurer, read Ulysseus and felt the poetic urge to write, travel, explore.

M.D. BAER: You’ve certainly done all of that. When did you begin playing guitar?

LEWIS: I was singing in bands before I ever began playing the guitar. It wasn’t until my second move to L.A. that I picked up the guitar, when I was twenty-two or twenty-three. Until then, everything I had written was in verse and books of poetic rambling, a lot of which would eventually be transformed into lyrics for songs, first with a band called The Ducks, then into the Fell Music project. For me, playing the guitar was always only a means to an end. No one would ever credit me with being a great musician because I’m not. And I’m a lot worse for wear after losing the left ring finger on my left hand. But I did always seek out a decent player, someone to collaborate with. I went through a few transformations before settling into a way of working that produced Fell Music.

M.D. BAER: Which was?

LEWIS: BY the time I met Arthur Barrow and Lotek Studios, I was immersed in writing with the guitar.  In fact, the first recordings I made with Arthur was with a bass player and a mandolin player, Jay Clark and Dorit Yaffe. These were songs the three of us had been playing around town in the coffeehouses, open mic’s, etc. That was in 1994.  I lost my finger in March of 1995 and didn’t begin again with Arthur until 1996. We completed, Crudland, the first Fell Music album, in 1997.

M.D. BAER: How did you meet Arthur Barrow?

LEWIS: Through Jamie Cohen. Jamie was a well known music A&R guy who eventually dropped out to pursue his art.  I met Jamie in the early 80’s, at a under-the-underground club on the Sunset Strip called AT SUNSET. I was one of the founders of At Sunset, and early on we ‘hired’ Jamie to DJ on occasion. But Jamie and I didn’t become close until we lived around the corner from each other in Venice, around 1992. From then on we became real close buddies and great friends. Jamie led me to Arthur and eventually Jamie and I recorded 66 songs together with Andy Kravitz on a project we named The Cheeters, from June, 2006 to the end of August, 2008.  Jamie was also a big contributor to the Venice Arts Club Music project. Jamie passed away Sept. 11, 2008.

Basically, from Arthur Barrow, I learned how to make music, how to tune in to sound, how to listen and how to record. One benefit from losing the finger was that I didn’t have to beat myself up over not being able to play the guitar well. With Arthur, all he has to do is to hear it once and he’s got it. Arthur was Frank Zappa’s bass player for years, but he was also what Frank called his Clonemiester, in that, being a multi-instrumentalist, Arthur was able to orchestrate Frank’s music for the rest of the band. So our process was that I would come in with an idea, usually fairly flushed out in terms of song and chord structure. We recorded the idea, usually a guitar to a click track, then build the song from there. My original guitar track would occasionally make it to the finished song, though often we would replace it with a stronger Arthur Barrow version. Arthur is also an amazing guitar player and a whiz on the organ, so we would pile on his talents to build songs then bring other talent in to record drums, background vocals, mandolin, whatever. Robert Williams, ex-drummer for Capt. Beefheart, was a big contributor, he played drums and percussion on a lot of the songs.

M.D. BAER: Two strong themes emerge from Fell Music, that of love/romance/unrequited love and the themes of social-commentary, protest.  It’s pretty much an even split, not only with the Fell Music stuff, but throughout your catalog including The Cheeters, Venice Arts Club Music and especially the New White Trash with author and activist, Michael C. Ruppert.

LEWIS: I mean, what else is there? Equal rights and justice for all, that’s my beat.  War is a lie. Politics and politicians play a money game for a money grab. Television and Madison Ave. are vacum’s built to sustain passivity and subtract life and imagination from those they attract. The real world is somewhere else. I figured out early on that Vietnam was a calculated and cold-blooded propaganda campaign built on media cooperation and most of all built on fear…fear of the VC, fear of communism, fear of the unknown. So yea, my writing and songs have to do with a world of hearts and bones, love and loss, a through the looking glass view from the here to beyond, an awakening and an enlightenment.

M.D. BAER: Several of the Fell Music tracks, songs like WAR CREEP, WAR ETERNAL, MORE WAR NOW, SAY NO MORE, have choruses sung by children. You give credit as the ‘Venice Children’s Choir’.  Why the kids?

LEWIS: Because they were available and because having the voices of children lends a certain irony to the subject of war and to the act of protest.

M.D. BAER: Your history of working with Kristen Vigard begins with Fell Music.

LEWIS: Yes.  When Kristen and I met in the early 80’s, she was part of the NY art and music scene, as a performer and a catalyst. She came to L.A. and we met At Sunset. She sings a lot of backgrounds of the Fell Music project, and we collaborated on several songs including TIDE GOES IN, TIDE GOES OUT, also SUNCAT. There are others.

M.D. BAER: There are seven Fell Music albums and you’ve made only four available on the Bandcamp site?

LEWIS: Three of the four albums available on Bandcamp are compilations pulled from the complete body of work. The fourth – Fell Music FOUR – is the complete last album Arthur and I recorded together. FOUR is its own thing in that it chronicles my dance with cancer during that period of 2006-2007.

M.D. BAER: GROOVING WITH THE ARCHETYPES is an article written by Bud Theisen about you and the Venice Arts Club. This story, about music and healing, is pretty compelling. A reader would discover how this was not your first dance?

LEWIS: The reader would discover how in February of 2003 I was diagnosed with a malignant sarcoma and given six months to live, max. A similar recurrence and diagnosis came around again in mid-2006.

M.D. BAER: Similar but the same?

LEWIS: The same but different. There is that same echoey quality to the news itself. Like someone shouting out the diagnosis to your through a megaphone from very far away. But they are not shouting, the voice whispers but the echo builds and the force of the resonance, when the vibration hits, is dangerous and can kill. You have to remain standing, take the blowback with the stagger and stare down the light. I have a particular point of reference, and the imagery of that reference is of a horse.  A tall horse, standing somewhere, maybe in a field or a battleground, I can’t tell, and where doesn’t matter, nor does ‘why’. The horse towers above me and takes up the frame. And it’s always been my duty to get myself up and on the horse. ON Fell FOUR, the song XYZ is my dealings with it all though all the songs on FOUR are tied to the themes of recovery and alternative levels of healing.

M.D. BAER: Well, thanks for sharing.

LEWIS: Alright. Thank you.

FELL MUSIC

Hammond Organ at Lotek Studios.  Image/Patricia DeLaRosa

Fell Music Original Artwork.  Image/Patricia DeLaRosa

Arthur Barrow

Robert Williams at Lotek Studios

Doug Lewis at Lotek Studios. Image/Cara Tompkins


The Cheeters – Lies In High Fidelity

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The CHEETERS – Lies In High Fidelity

The CHEETERS, Gunter Vile (aka Doug Lewis), Klaus Kertz (Andy Kravitz) and Dietrich Von Bone (Jamie Cohen)are an art band – their music is an art project.  The Cheeters were not built to last, they were about a go for broke moment – They went deep and deeper still – Buddha was in the back seat and Bacchus was at the wheel.  The Cheeters are an urgent confession, an uncompromising creative explosion marked by intelligence in the tradition of Captain Beefheart, Rage Against the Machine, and Nick Cave. The music is solid, inspired but it is the subtle lyrics, the sophisticated imagery and the complex multi-textured sound mix that is the band’s trademark.  There is humor and passion and the pure joy of invention in this music and the Cheeters always tell the truth and never pull their punches.  This music is made from stories told of lives lived, not fantasies, told by guys that got laid, not guys wishing they got laid.  What strikes one about listening to the Cheeters is how present they are, how in the zeitgeist, giving you the newest news, the latest edition. They embraced randomness and found objects.  What does that mean? I get a call from Gunter, car noise, clanking beer cans, he’s somewhere in Santa Fe, “Hey man, we just met this chick in a 7-11 while stopping for cigarettes and she says she can sing.  We’re headed back to the studio now.” There was no master plan.  They were on a wild ride, totally dedicated to the realm of the magical and committed and it was all holy.  It was dangerous, probably crazy and they were on a grand high, a high stakes transcendent journey reduced to a three box set.  That is how the dust settles on angels with outstretched wings.  Gunter Vile and Dietrich Von Bone had a shared sensibility that went back over twenty five years.  They wrote together and emerged as one voice.  They knew how to tread in darkness, they knew how to mine the madness and they knew the poetry of lust and outrage.  Gunter Vile is a master of the crooked phrase, a knowing wit and a musical sensibility informed by the bands of his psychedelic Marin County youth such as Tower of Power and the Sons of Champlin.  Von Bone was also a consummate wordsmith, steeped in the blues and in the dada-surrealist sensibility.  Listen to the Cheeters and you will hear echoes of absurdist poet, Tristian Tzara, as well as Kurt Weil and Bertolt Brecht.  Weil & Brecht.  Vile & Bone.  If they met they’d share respect. Klaus Kertz (aka Andy Kravitz), a two time Grammy winning producer, mixer, writer, engineer, and drummer was their soul brother, the catalytic third element and the maestro of the secret sauce. The Cheeters are about love, beauty, the ambiguous ephemeral, life, death and sex.  It’s not only rock and roll but you’ll like it.  M.D. Baer, July 4, 2009.

THE CHEETERS – LIES IN HIGH FIDELITY, available on Bandcamp.  Recorded June 8, 2007 to September 11, 2008 in Montauk, Philly, Santa Fe, NM, Venice, CA.  Lies In High Fidelity is the first of a three volume set.


The Cheeters “Falling High”